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Fairtrade Jersey
Encouraging the growth of Fairtrade by increasing the knowledge and use of Fairtrade products in Jersey
Fairtrade Jersey
Encouraging the growth of Fairtrade by increasing the knowledge and use of Fairtrade products in Jersey

Proposition put to the States of Jersey on March 12th 2004

FAIRTRADE ISLAND

The States are asked to decide whether they are of the opinion –

  1. to support all possible initiatives to enable the Island to be recognised by the Fairtrade Foundation as a Fairtrade Island and, in particular, to agree that :
    1. Fairtrade coffee and tea should be served at meetings of the States and of Committees of the States;
    2. the States should promote awareness of Fairtrade on a regular basis on the States of Jersey website and in publications produced, or sponsored, by the States;
    3. the Planning and Environment Committee be requested, in partnership with the Jersey Fairtrade steering group, to ensure continued commitment to the Fairtrade initiative;
    4. street signs should be erected declaring Jersey as a Fairtrade Island if this status is obtained; and
  2. to request all Committees and Departments of the States to take all appropriate steps to support Fairtrade products in their purchasing policies.

This proposition presented by Senator J.A. Le Maistre was passed by 42 votes to 3 in the States Asembly.

Report

The Fairtrade logo states simply "Fairtrade Guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers".

The idea of the Fairtrade Town initiative was born in the UK in 1999 when an enterprising Oxfam group in the Lancashire market town of Garstang was considering the next step in its campaign to promote Fairtrade. The campaign to make Garstang the world’s first Fairtrade Town, caught the imagination of the local community which was galvanized by support from local shopkeepers, businesses and the council and engaged the attention of the local and regional media.

The campaign also won the endorsement of prominent politicians, including the Mayor, the local Member of Parliament and George Foulkes, Minister at the Department for International Development.

From this initiative many towns and cities in the UK have become committed to the aims of Fairtrade and have gained recognition by the Fairtrade Foundation.

The Five Goals required to be met to achieve Fairtrade status are set down by the Foundation.  They are as follows :

  1. The local Council passes a resolution supporting Fairtrade, and agrees to serve Fairtrade Coffee and Tea at its meetings and in its offices and canteens.  (Full text below).
  2. A range of Fairtrade products are readily available in the area’s shops and served in at least two (or four if a city) local/cafés/catering establishments.
  3. Fairtrade products are used by at least 10 (or 20 if a city) local businesses and organizations.
  4. Attract media coverage and popular support for the campaign.
  5. A local Fairtrade steering group is convened to ensure continued commitment to its Fairtrade Town status.

The full text of number (1) above as it appears in the Fairtrade leaflet is as follows -

  • Local council passes a resolution supporting Fairtrade, and agrees to serve Fairtrade coffee and tea at its meetings and in its offices and canteens.
  • Local council commits itself to promoting awareness of Fairtrade to its constituency on a regular basis, through its free publication (if it has one) and other outlets.
  • Local council allocates Fairtrade Town responsibilities to a member of staff or committee (possibly its Environmental or Agenda 21 officer working in partnership with a local Fairtrade steering group) to ensure continued commitment to its Fairtrade Town status.
  • Street signs are erected declaring it as a Fairtrade Town.

This island has been a leader in demonstrating its commitment, over the last 35 years, in developing a program of assistance to third world countries both through funding aid and also through practical assistance.  We now have an opportunity to further strengthen our commitment to the relief of suffering in third world countries by promoting the sale of Fairtrade products in our community.

All goods bearing the Fairtrade Mark have to be approved by the Fairtrade Foundation and an explanation of this is to be found in the attached leaflet entitled "An introduction to Fairtrade".

Jersey already has an impressive list of suppliers of Fairtrade goods which are as follows :

  • The Oxfam Shop,  New Street, St Helier.
  • The Co-op Stores.
  • Checkers.
  • Waitrose Stores
  • Marks and Spencer Stores
  • Coopers Coffee, Halkett Place, St Helier.
  • Spice House,  Central Market, St Helier.
  • Organic Shop, Stopford Road, St Helier.
  • St. Ouen’s Community Market.
  • St. Lawrence’s Community Market.

Fairtrade coffees are served at BHS Store, Marks and Spencer Cafe, Bean Around The World, MangeTout, The Daily Grind, The Opera House cafe and Bagel Bar. They are served at Bistro Victoria at Victoria College.  Tell us if you know of others.

There are now more than 5,000 Fairtrade products available in U.K. stores.

The States of Jersey serves only Fairtrade teas and coffees at official meetings.

Jersey officially became a Fairtrade Island on 18th. February 2005 at a ceremony in St. Helier Methodist Centre when Simeon Greene, the Windward Island Banana Producers representative in Britain,  presented a certificate signed by Harriet Lamb, the Chief Executive of the Fairtrade Fundation to Senator Jean Le Maistre. The status of Fairtrade Island was renewed on 20th. August 2012 at a celebratory event attended by The Chief Minister, Senator Ian Gorst.